SODA & TELEPATHS

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GENNDY TARTAKOVSKY’S PRIMAL- Come For Visuals, Stay For Emotion

GENNDY TARTAKOVSKY'S PRIMAL- Come For Visuals, Stay For Emotion 1

Another banger from the cartoon master

When I first heard about Genndy Tartakovsky’s Primal, I was in. I grew up watching Dexter’s Laboratory. But I became a huge fan with Samurai Jack. And his version of Star Wars’ Clone Wars was just icing on the cake.

But where I went in thinking I was going to enjoy some stunning visuals, and perhaps a neat story, I didn’t know I was going to feel.

Some stories just strike on one or two emotions. But this was a complete journey that developed and evolved over the short twenty minutes. And when I thought the story was done on one note, it kept going further.

You know something’s good when you’re watching something alone, and you’re expressing out loud. I often found myself saying, “Oh, sh**/f***k,” or “Oh my God.”

Spear and Fang

There was no dialogue; only music, visuals, and sounds to drive the story. It reminded me of when I watched Mad Max: Fury Road. Where there weren’t many words from Tom Hardy’s caged mouth, the action, motors, and soundtrack literally drove the movie from one end to the other. Also, I had a friend once who enjoyed Classical music. He told me that lyrics and vocals told you how to feel. Whereas, without them, the music drives your emotions.

The pilot episode of Primal was called “Spear and Fang.” It told the story of the two title characters. It begins with a caveman crouching on a rock. With the weapon in his hand, I assumed Spear was his name. Spear hunts down a T-Rex. But your heart is ripped out when you see it eat his family. It actually showed the wife and two kids going into the dinosaur’s mouth, and blood dripping from its teeth.

Then, the story takes a turn. Spear contemplates suicide. He walks to a ledge, and inches closer as pebbles fall off the cliff. I said out loud, “Sh**, this just got deep.” Then, Spear sees his family in the sun. Without words, they tell him to push on. The drawn-out moment of Spear watching his family drew tears in my eyes.

The Plot Thickens

The episode could have ended there. But no sir, it did not.

Spear sees Fang (again, I’m going to assume this T-Rex’s name is Fang). There’s hate and vengeance in his eyes. But when he goes to hunt it, he notices that Fang has a couple of babies. His tune really changes when a couple larger, red T-Rex’s show up. Maybe these were a differenty type of dinosaur. But I’m not keen on all the different classifications. Spear helps his family’s killer protect its own babies, and as a thank you, the babies snuggle up to Spear.

The episode could have even ended there. But like I said, the emotions told the story. And they both just kept devoloping and evolving.

The red dinosaur they failed to kill eats the baby T-Rex’s in the same fashion Fang ate Spear’s. That really felt like a punch in the gut. Therefore, Spear and Fang become more than a team-up. I don’t have to tell you, and the visuals didn’t have to tell you. But the two become friends by the end of the episode. And that my friend, is the true journey of a story.

GENNDY TARTAKOVSKY'S PRIMAL- Come For Visuals, Stay For Emotion 6

But wait, there’s more…

This could have been a one-shot episode. The story could have even stopped there, yet. But this will be an entire series.

How many episodes? I’m not sure. But I’ll tell you, I’m anxious for the next one. Luckily, I won’t have to wait another week for it. Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim will air an episode every day this week. But I hope the series won’t stop there.

By the context of this review, you don’t need my further dialogue to tell you I’m gonna give this a perfect score. If there were more sodas in a pack than six, I would give Primal however many it needs.

How did we rate Genndy Tartakovsky’s Primal? 6 sodas

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