FRANK AT HOME ON THE FARM #1 – Isolationist and Ominous Horror

Frank at Home on the Farm #1

Frank At Home On The Farm and A Family Missing

Frank At Home On The Farm #1 taps into the kind of ominous fear and dread that films like Netflix Original 1922 explore. The paranoia writer Jordan Thomas explores is exemplified by the isolation that his key protagonist Frank sees and feels. This is a new type of horror about an old type of world.

What's the score!?
  • 70%
    Awesomeness - 70%
  • 80%
    Plot - 80%
  • 90%
    Characters - 90%
  • 90%
    Tone - 90%
82.5%

Summary

Frank at Home on the Farm #1

Writer: Jordan Thomas
Artist: Clark Bint

Clark Bint’s style is to be applauded. The accentuation and of corners and angles makes for interesting artwork. Artwork that allows the reader to fall into. Just as Frank continues to plummet into madness. It’s reminiscent of Gabriel Rodriguez’s work in Locke and Key.

Frank At Home On The Farm #1 features key character Frank (surprise, surprise!) and his return home to his family’s farm after the Great War. Upon returning to his farm, Frank finds empty stables, empty pens and an empty house. His family is gone. With nothing and no one remaining except the farm yard animals.

After a short time Frank heads 2 miles into town. An exact measurement that writer Jordan Thomas constantly brings up vicariously through Frank’s dialogue and bewildered confusion that no one knows his family. Or has any idea where they have disappeared off to.

Frank at Home on the Farm #1

The Town is not to be Trusted

The mix of townsfolk taps into a variety of small town stereotypes: an old shopkeeper, a farmer, a blacksmith, a young mother, a pair of smart mouthed kids. Though it’s the local policeman Frank approaches where things get really interesting when a friendly dog turns hyper aggressive. Aggressive in the vein of Cujo-like proportions.

Its the next scene where Frank is at home and in a dream state that certain uneasy revelations start to unravel. A dream so visceral, thanks to Clark Bint’s artistic chops, that it evokes imagery of the Great War, shell shock and enemy troops. Troops that have had animal heads quite literally stitched on. A telltale sign of PTSD meets isolation based horror.

Waking up from his dream state, Frank is in a daze and starts to hear voices. Voices that can only be coming from where the farm animals reside. With this unexplained paranoia and family still missing Frank heads to the home of a friend of his father’s.

Frank at Home on the Farm #1

Frank is all Alone

Albert Rogers, old, senile and clear suffering from the onset of dementia accepts Frank’s visit. In a dizzying spell he lets loose some information that Frank’s father suffered from an accident. An accident of what and who is unclear.

This leaves an opportunity for Bint and Thomas to explore another onset of crazed paranoia back on the farm. With the uncomfortable feeling at the end of the issue: Frank is all alone with the animals.

Clark Bint’s style is to be applauded. The accentuation and of corners and angles makes for interesting artwork. Artwork that allows the reader to fall into. Just as Frank continues to plummet into madness. It’s reminiscent of Gabriel Rodriguez’s work in Locke and Key.

Frank At Home On The Farm #1 is available through this link.